Ellicott’s Stone
When Spain took Mobile, it became part of Spanish West Florida. As American settlers began to move south and westward, the northern boundary between the United States and Spanish West Florida came into dispute. The Treaty of San Lorenzo set the boundary at the 31st parallel. American surveyor Andrew Ellicott marked the dividing line with this stone. On the United States side the inscription was in English and on the Spanish West Florida side, it was in Spanish.

Ellicott's Stone

Ellicott’s Stone
(side with Spanish inscription)

Ellicott's Stone

Ellicott’s Stone
(side with English inscription)

Magnolia Cemetery

Magnolia Cemetery
Established in 1827, the Magnolia Cemetery was one of the first cemeteries in Mobile.

Michael Krafft's Tombstone in Magnolia Cemetery

Michael Krafft’s Tombstone in Magnolia Cemetery
Mardi Gras, in its modern form, was first celebrated in Mobile in 1831 by Michael Krafft. During Mardi Gras costumed merrymakers throw beads, candy, and toys from decorated floats.

Entrance to Church Street Cemetery

Entrance to Church Street Cemetery
This cemetery was established in 1819 for victims of yellow fever. Many pioneer Americans died because they did not have the medicines like we have today to combat disease.

Church Street Cemetery

Church Street Cemetery
In the early days at the Church Street Cemetery people were buried in raised tombs. Spanish, French, and American citizens of early Mobile are buried there.

Springhill Avenue Temple 
Cemetery Entrance

Springhill Avenue Temple Cemetery Entrance
The congregation Shaarai Shomayim was incorporated by the State of Alabama in 1844; today it is known as Springhill Avenue Temple.

Springhill Avenue Temple
Jewish Cemetery

Springhill Avenue Temple Jewish Cemetery

A view inside Ahavas Chesed Jewish Cemetery

A view inside Ahavas Chesed Jewish Cemetery

Mobile Cadets Monument in Magnolia Cemetery

Mobile Cadets Monument in Magnolia Cemetery
A section known as "Cadets Corner" was established for grave sites for members of the Mobile Cadets. As early as 1844 local young men organized themselves into a soldier company that became known as the Mobile Cadets. Their balls, annual encampments, drills, and marksmanship competitions became popular social events. They served as the state militia home guards. They also served in the Civil War, the Spanish-American War, and World War I.

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Updated: February 28, 2007
Alabama Department of Archives & History
624 Washington Avenue
Montgomery, Alabama 36130-0100
Phone: (334) 242-4435
E-Mail:debbie.pendleton@archives.alabama.gov