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Thomas McAdory Owen's Revolutionary Soldiers in Alabama

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y

 

SALTER, JOHN (1760-1834) enlisted, 1778, as musician in Capt. Jethro Sumner's company, Col. Thomas Clark's regiment, 1st North Carolina battalion. He was born in Tennessee; died in Monroeville, Alabama.—D.A.R. Lineage Book, Vol. 134, page 264.

 

SALTER, KATE—(Mrs. J. S. Kitchens) real daughter, grave marked Feb. 25, 1928, at Monroeville, Needham Bryan Chapter D.A.R. - See General D.A.R. Reports 1927-28. p. 121.

 

SAMPLE, JESSE or SAMPLEY, applied for Revolutionary pension in Rhea County, Tenn., in 1833. He was born in 1763 or 1764 in Spartanburg, S.C. He removed with his parents to Edgefield District, S.C., and to Richmond County, Ga., where his Father was killed by the Tories and his home destroyed. Jesse Sample returned to Edgefield District, S.C., where he enlisted: in June 1799 [sic]. He served in Captain John Carter's company, Colonel LeRoy Hammond's regiment. He enlisted again in 1789 [?] and served in Captain James Withers' company, Colonel Eugh Horry's South Carolina regiment and was at the skirmish on Little Pedee River and in battles of Fort Watson and Fort Motte. He enlisted again in Captain Jacob Wise's South Carolina company. After the Revolution he lived in Edgefield District with his mother. He moved to Georgia, returned to South Carolina, moved to Tennessee where he lived in several East Tennessee counties. In 1839 he was living in Jackson County, Alabama, having removed from Tennessee because his children, whose names are not given, lived there.—Armstrong, Some Tennessee Heroes of the Revolution, vol. 3.

 

SAMPELS, JESSE, aged 79, resided in Jackson County, June 1, 1840. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

 

SAMPLE, JOHN, SR., aged 75, and a resident of Marengo County; private S.C. Militia; enrolled on July 25, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $30.88. Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

SAUNDERS, JOSEPH, aged 77, and a resident of Lawrence County; lieutenant of navy, Virginia State Navy; enrolled on February 14, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $365.20.--Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

SAWYER, JOSEPH. Died at the residence of S. J. House, on the 22nd inst. Mr. Joseph Sawyer, at the advanced age of 101 years, 8 months and 11 days. Mr. Sawyer was a native of Prague (Bohemia). He emigrated to the United States in the year 1776, during the revolutionary struggle, in which he took an active part, being attached to Col. Washington's cavalry. Besides several engagements of minor importance, he was in the battle of Eutaw Springs, S. C. After the revolution he returned to his native country on a visit. On his return to the United States, he was seized by a press gang in London, and placed on board a man of war, where he remained three years. Through the agency of a smuggling vessel he made his escape to Holland; from thence he took passage to the United States. He emigrated to this State about fifteen years ago and remained in this county till his death.— Huntsville Democrat, November 25, 1837.

 

SAWYER, STEPHEN, aged 75, and a resident of Greene County; private N.C. Militia; enrolled on March 21, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $40.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

SAXON, JAMES, a resident of Autauga County; private, particular service not shown; enrolled on February 16, 1820, under act of Congress of March 18, 1818, payment to date from September 4, 1834; annual allowance, $96; died January 17, 1836. Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile.

 

SCARBROUGH, ELIAS, aged 94, resided in Clarke County, June 1, 1840. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.

 

SCOTT, JAMES served as corporal in the 1st regiment, South Carolina infantry, in Capt. George Turner's company, Col. Charles C. Pinckney's regiment. He was living in Scotts Ferry during the Revolution; died in Alabama.—D.A.R. Lineage Book, Vol. 108, page 313. SCOTT, THOMAS BAYTOP—Died on the 5th inst. (February) at the residence of his brother, General John Scott, near Cahaba, in the 60th year of his age, Major Thomas B. Scott, late of Georgia, while on a visit yielding the double satisfaction of giving and receiving pleasure, a latent disease assailed him with an obstinancy that defied medical skill, and a house of gladness in a few short days became a house of sorrow. He was a man whose character was so far beyond reach of slander that his name deserves an honorable record in the catalogue of American patriots; his private virtues have left a memento engraven on the hearts of his relatives and friends, as durable as life, and not to be obliterated until they cease to throb.—Montgomery Republican, Montgomery, Ala., Feb. 24, 1821.

 

SCOTT, THOMAS BAYTOP , born 1761, died February 25th, 1821. Married a Miss Cunningham of the Abbeville District, South Carolina. He died while on a visit to his brother Gen. John Scott, and is buried on Gen. Scott's plantation in Lowndes County, Ala., which is located on the present new Selma road just beyond the bridge over Pintlala Creek. This creek separates Montgomery and Lowndes Counties. The old covered bridge was known as Scott's Bridge. He was a son of captain James Scott, born about 1725, and Frances Collier, born about 1750, daughter of John Collier.—Note given by Frank Kerochan Scott, 737 South Perry Street, Montgomery, Ala. See also Sims' Francis Morgan, p. 103.

 

SEALE, JARVIS, a resident of Greene County; private, particular service not shown; enrolled on July 8, 1835, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $20. Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile.

 

SEVIER, CATHERINE SHERRILL (1755-1836) was a patriotic woman who aided the cause by furnishing horses, wagons, provisions, and supplies for the army. She was born in North Carolina; died in Russellville, Alabama.—D.A.R. Lineage Book, Vol. 57, page 58.

 

SEVIER, GOVERNOR JOHN. "This hero of the Revolution, whose life was a romance, was not one of the pioneer settlers of Alabama. He died in this State and his remains lay buried here for seventy-three years 'without a stone to mark the place of their repose or an enclosure to protect them from unhallowed intrusion.' In 1888 his body was removed by the State of Tennessee and laid to rest beneath the sod of the State he had loved and served so faithfully. He is now buried in Knoxville, and the State has erected a stately monument as a memorial of her everlasting though tardy gratitude to her honored son.

 

 "Valentine Xavier, the father of John Sevier, was a descendant from an ancient Huguenot family in Navarre; he was born in London and emigrated to America about 1740; settled on the Shenandoah, Virginia; removed to Watauga, N.C., and finally settled on the Nolachucka, at Plum Grove. —See Pioneer Women of the West.
 

"John Sevier was born in Rockingham Co., Va., 23rd of September, 1745, and was educated at the academy in Fredericksburg. He was married at the early age of seventeen to Sarah Hawkins; soon afterwards he founded Newmarket, in the valley of the Shenandoah; he became at once celebrated as an Indian fighter, and was made captain of the Virginia line in 1772. That spring (1772) he removed to Watauga, now Tennessee, served in Lord Dunmore's war and was in the battle of Point Pleasant, 1774. 'His work began at the dawn of the Revolution and lasted to the end.' It is said he was in thirty battles. His wife's health was delicate and she never removed from Virginia, but died in 1779, leaving him ten children. In 1780, he married Catharine Sherrill, daughter of Samuel Sherrill of North Carolina, who was one of the pioneers in the valley of the Watauga. She was beautiful, tall, strong and courageous as became the wife of John Sevier. She always boasted that the first work she did after she was married was to spin and weave and make the suits of clothes which her husband and his three sons wore in the memorable battle of King's Mountain. She became the mother of eight children, three sons and five daughters. After the battle of King's Mountain, John Sevier received a vote of thanks and a present of a sword and pistol from the North Carolina legislature. A fellow soldier said of his appearance during the battle: 'His eyes were flames of fire, and his words were electric bolts crashing down the ranks of the enemy.'

 

"He was elected governor of the State of Franklin in 1784; but, as this State was not long allowed existence, Sevier was captured and imprisoned because of alleged disloyalty. However, he was rescued and soon made his escape. That section of country was then given the name by the United States government of 'Territory south of the river Ohio,' and he was made brigadier-general of this section in 1789. He was the first delegate sent to represent the Territory in Congress in 1790. During all this time he was incessantly and successfully engaged in defending the settlements from the Indians until their spirit was broken and peace was fully established. No man was ever more feared or respected by them, and as for the white people of the settlements, they loved him as a father, friend and protector. When the State of Tennessee was established, he was elected the first governor in 1796, and served three terms. In 1815, in spite of his age and infirmities, he was appointed by President Monroe to act as United States commissioner to settle the boundary line between Georgia and the Creek territory in Alabama. He died while engaged in this work, September 24th, 1815. He was attended during his illness by only a few soldiers and Indians. He was buried near Fort Decatur, Alabama, on the east side of the Tallapoosa River, at an Indian village called Tuckabatchee, with the honors of war by the troops under command of Capt. Walker, United States Army. He was in the active service of his country from a boy of eighteen until he died at the age of seventy." Mrs. P. H. Mell in Transactions of the Alabama Historical Society, vol. iv, pp. 565-566.

 

SHERRILL, ADAM, was born on the Yadkin, 1758, and died at Russellville, Ala., whither he had gone with his sister, "Bonny Kate", the widow of Colonel Sevier. His wife was Mary, a daughter of Cornelius Cormack, and his son Enos married Mary Abernathy. Adam was in the battle at Boyd's Creek and King's Mountain.—White's King's Mountain Men, p. 224.

 

SHEPHERD, R. S., aged 73, resided in Jefferson County, June 1, 1840, with Sarah Nabers. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.

 

SHUMAKER, HARMON, aged 73, and a resident of Fayette County; private, Maryland Militia; enrolled on July 12, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $40.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

SIBLEY, JOHN, sergeant, particular service not shown; annual allowance, $120; records do not show that any payments were ever made.—Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile.

 

SIDES, HENRY—born in 1734, was of a Holland Dutch family that immigrated to America shortly before the Revolutionary War, and family tradition states that Henry Sides served with distinction during that war. About 1818, while Alabama was still a territory, Henry Sides, then of advanced age, came to Walker County with several married sons and their families, among these sons being Henry, William, Levi, John, and Moses. He made his home with his son, William, who settled south of Pleasant Grove, and when he died he was buried in the Sides Graveyard on the old home place. Sides Family Tradition. Gravestone.—Dombhart's History of Walker County, Alabama, page 342.

 

SIMPSON, ELISHA, aged 76, and a resident of Washington County; private, N.C. Militia; enrolled on September 24, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $36.66.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

SIMPSON, JAMES, aged 79, resided in Randolph County, June 1, 1840, with William Simpson. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

 

SKANES, ADAM, aged 85, resided in Butler County, June 1, 1840, with Adam Skanes, sen. Census of Pensioners, 1841. p. 149.

 

SLOAN, SAMUEL, aged 76, and a resident of Limestone County; private, N.C. Continental Line; enrolled on February 29, 1832, under act of Congress of March 18, 1818, payment to date from February 24, 1832; annual allowance, $96; sums received to date of publication of list, $146.48.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

SLOCOMB, EZEKIEL, (1760-1841). Served in the Rangers, keeping down the Royalists. His young wife took care of the farm in his absence and her heroism is recorded in history. He was born in Wayne County, North Carolina; died in Alabama.-- D.A.R. Lineage Book, Vol. 36, Page 255.

 

SMITH, ISAAC. "The Rev. Isaac Smith, a native of Virginia, for three years an orderly sergeant in the army under Washington and Lafayette, the friend and host of Bishop Asbury, and other of the Bishops of the Church, for more than half a century a minister of the Gospel, serving the longest term at Asbury Mission of any man ever connected with it, and terminating his active ministry at that place, was a man of noble character, a model Christian, and he made an honorable record. 'Believing every word of God, meek above the reach of provocation, and thoroughly imbued with the spirit of love and devotion, he was a saint indeed.'

 

 

"An incident may be related here which will relate his patriotism, and which will indicate his fidelity to the ministry and his constant adherence to his religion. In August 1824, Marquis De La Fayette, the friend of Washington and of American liberty, made a visit to the United States, landing at New York, and he was tendered a reception worthy of his patriotic services and worth yof the country whose liberty he had helped to achieve. The Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Alabama in General Assembly convened, at Cahaba, Alabama, passed, by unanimous vote, a resolution, which was approved December 24, 1824, as follows: 'And be it further resolved, That his excellency the Governor be requested to invite, in such manner as he shall deem most respectful, Major General La Fayette to honor the State of Alabama with a visit, and in the event of his acceptance of such invitation, he be received in such manner as shall best comport with the important services he has rendered the American people.' In pursuance of the resolution, Governor Pickens invited the distinguished guest of the nation to Alabama and the invitation was accepted, and the visit was made. On March 31, 1825, the venerable and honored La Fayette under an escort of Georgians, halted, in the midst of the Creek Nation, upon the eastern bank of the Chattahoochee River, whose western side laves the soil of Alabama. The Georgia escort delivered the hero of American liberty, and their guest, to fifty nude and painted Creek Indian warriors. The Indians, vying with the citizens of the United States in the homage paid the noble Frenchman, conveyed him across the river and put him down on Alabama soil. He was then about one mile from the Asbury school. One of the first white men to greet La Fayette when he set foot on Alabama soil was the man who for three years attended him as orderly sergeant, and carried messages for him while the struggle for the independence of the American colonies went on. That man was the Rev. Isaac Smith, the Missionary in charge of the Asbury School for the Indians. They greeted, recollected, and recognized each other. There in the howling wilderness, and in the presence of painted warriors and naked savages, the old comrades in arms embraced each other, and gave expression to their friendship, and vent to their emotions, and the once young orderly, now a grave preacher of the Gospel and a devoted Missionary, prayed with and for the old Commander and patriot, and with deep emotion, strong faith, and earnest petitions commended him to the court of Heaven, and besought for him citizenship in the Kingdom of Christ, and the liberty which pertains to the sons of God. How anomalous and yet how appropriate all this! No event in all the course of that triumphal tour through the American continent made a deeper or more lasting impression upon the old patriot than that reunion of himself and the orderly sergeant of the former times, on the borders of Alabama. La Fayette tarried for the day, and he and Smith, the Missionary to the Indians, talked of the past and the present, in sweet counsel, and in the meantime witnessed one of those special contests and social pastimes peculiar to the aborigines, a game of ball. The meeting of his old Commander at the very spot of his missionary labors was one of the unexpected pleasures which the Rev. Mr. Smith enjoyed beyond description. That meeting recollected the reminiscences of the past, revived his spirits, renewed his youth, strengthened his patriotism, and made an epoch in his eventful hife.

 

 "The Rev. Isaac Smith died in Monroe County, Georgia, at the age of seventy-six, and went to his eternal home. His children have honored him by religious lives." Rev. Dr. Anson West's History of Methodism in. Alabama, pp. 380-2.

 

SMITH, JAMES, aged 81, resided in Jackson County, June 1, 1840, with James P. Smith. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

 

SMITH, JOHN, aged 69, and a resident of Madison County; private, N.C. Militia; enrolled on September 26, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $80.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Jackson County, June 1, 1840, with Larkin Smith, aged 77. Census of Pensioners, 184l, p. 148.

 

SMITH, JOHN, aged 73, and a resident of Bibb County; private, S.C. Militia and Continental Line; enrolled on May 29, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $80; sums received to date of publication of list, $240.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Part 3, Vol. xiii, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

SMITH, MATTHEW (1750-1816) served as second lieutenant and quartermaster in the 1st Virginia regiment under Capt. Goodrich Crump and Col. Isaac Reed. He was born in Ireland; died in Lawrence County, Ala.—D.A.R. Lineage Book, vol. 158, page 75.

 

SMITH, REBECCA, AGED 39, resided in Jackson County, June 1, 1840. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

 

SMITH, THOMAS—Autauga County, Grave located.—D.A.R. Report, 1927-28, p. 109.

 

SPEER, WILLIAM--Applied for a pension in Jefferson County, Ala., May 15, 1856, giving his age as ninety-seven years. He signed with his mark. He was drafted and his residence during service was in Surry County, N.C. He served a tour of three months in Capt. Samuel Maseby's Company, Col. Joseph Williams' Regiment of Battalion. He then volunteered for a tour of three months as ensign in company of Capt. Henry Speer, Col. Joseph Phillips' Regiment or Battalion. Later volunteered for tour of three months as a private in Capt. David Humphries' Company, Col. James Martin's Regiment. He was so young during his first tour that his Captain proposed to his father that he furnish a pack horse for the service and that he remain at home, which was done. This seems to have been in addition to the service shown above. Affidavits were signed by the Rev. Benjamin Tarrant and L. G. McMillan as to his character. He was born in 1758 on the Eastern Shores of Maryland. The record of his birth is now in possession of his granddaughter. He lived in Surry County, N.C.; was in Kentucky, 1801-1824, and in Alabama since 1824. Abraham Estep, in North Carolina, was his brother-in-law. Another application was dated December 8, 1855, in Jefferson County, and with it was an affidavit of Nathan Byars, Justice of Peace, dated December 10, 1855, that William Speer had made affidavit for the heirs of William Hughlett of Kentucky, that he had sworn therein that Major, then Captain Hughlett, had served under his brother Capt. Henry Speer of North Carolina. An affidavit of August 12, 18.56, states that he was the only William Speer in Surry County, N.C. when he entered the Revolutionary service and the only one of that name in the regiments in which he served. A statement was signed by many citizens in Jefferson County, February 16, 1856. The North Carolina Comptroller has the following statement as to his payments: Certificate 33361 issued August 12, 1856 at $25.88 per annum from March 4. 1831, under Act June 7, 1832.—Information from Pension Files, National Archives, Washington, D. C.

 

SPEER, WILLIAM—Buried in the Bivens Cemetery, on the old Jasper Road.—General D.A.R. Report, 1926.

 

SPELCE, JOHN—Died in 1843 and buried at Concord Church, two miles west of Sulphur Springs, Madison County, Ala. —General D.A.R. Report, 1915.

 

SPIVEY, AARON —Revolutionary soldier, was wounded in the thigh and was a private. Reference: Hillsboro, N.C. Treasury Office, 1785.—A list of species and currency certificates. Received of County Treasury, entry papers, etc. By whom paid: Nathan Williams, Sheriff of Johnston County, N.C. Person to whom Principal Interest Name issued: Aaron Spivey, 10-12-0.—N. C. Revolutionary Army Accounts, Vol. 9, p. 95, Folio 2, Raleigh, N. C.

 

SJPIVEY, AARON—Added to Revolutionary Roster.—General D.AR. Report, 1929.

 

SPLANN, CORNELIUS, age not given, a resident of Morgan County; sergeant, 8th Regular U. S. Infantry; enrolled on October 15, 1818, payment to date from July 23, 1818; annual allowance; $48; sums received to date of publication of list, $557.69; Acts Military establishment. Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 2rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

STAFFORD, DAVID, aged 74, and a resident of Morgan County; private, Virginia Continental Line; enrolled on May 16, 1826, under act of Congress of March 18, 1818, payment to date from April 22, 1826; annual allowance, $96; sums received to date of publication of list, $707.46.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

STANFORD, THOMAS, age not given; resided in Marion County, June 1, 1840. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

 

STARNES, GEORGE—Mary G. Duffee in "Sketches of Jones Valley" p. 4, No. 34, tells of the burial place of a George Starnes, Revolutionary soldier.

 

STARNES, NICHOLAS, aged 78, and a resident of Jefferson County; private, Virginia Militia; enrolled on July 18, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $20.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen .Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

STEELE, HANNAH HARRISON, widow of Samuel Steele, revolutionary soldier. Samuel Steel applied for regulationary pension while living in Monroe County, Tenn., Sept. 18, 1832. He was born 1760. He enlisted in April or May 1781 in Virginia troops while he was living in Augusta County, some of his officers being Capt. Samuel McCutcheon, Capt. Francis Long, Col. William Bowyer, Cal. McCrary, Col. Hubbert. He was in the battle of Hotwater. He moved to Tennessee after the Revolution. He died in Monroe County, April 6, 1845. His widow, Hannah Harrison Steele, applied for widow's pension while living in Jefferson County, Ala., Aug. 6, 1855, when she was 78 years of age, therefore born 1777. The marriage took place in Blount County, Tenn., May 19, 1817. Armstrong, Some Tennessee Heroes of the Revolution, Vol. 2.

 

STEPHENS, REUBEN, aged 77, resided in Chambers County, June 1, 1840. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.

 

STEWART, THOMAS, aged 76, and a resident of Autauga County; private, N.C. State Troops; enrolled on August 12, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $51.4a; sums received to date of publication of list, $154.35.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Part 3, Vol. xiii, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

STILLWAGON, "Mrs. Elizabeth Stillwagon was accidentally burnt to death at Connellsville on the 6th. She was 115 years old, and her husband was a Revolutionary soldier." The Southern Advocate. Hnntsville, Feb. 22, 1854.

 

STOCKMON, CHRISTOPHER, a resident of Mobile County; private, particular service not shown; enrolled on May 20, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; anntlal allowance, $20; transferred from North Carolina. Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile.

 

STOKES, SYLVESTER, aged 35, and a resident of Lawrence County; private, Virginia Continental Line; enrolled on March l4, 1827, under act of Congress of March 38, 1818, payment to date from February 2; 1827; annual allowance $96; sums received to date of publication of list, $536.51.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

STONE, JOHN—Applied for revolutionary pension September 20, 1825, when he was living in Moulton, Lawrence County, Alabama. His pension certificate was not issued, however, until December 13, 1828, when he had returned to Bedford County, Tenn., where he had formerly lived, to be with his children. He enlisted in Jonestown, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, in January or February, 1777, in Colonel Richard Hampton's Pennsylvania regiment and was wounded in the battle of Brandywine. He was taken prisoner and was held ten months. He was discharged March 24, 1781, by Captain W. Finney, 6th Pennsylvania Regiment. In his application he referred to his wife, Mary, but did not give her family name nor the date of their marriage. He mentioned his daughter Polly Tucker, aged 55 in 1825, and her son Jackson Tucker; a grandson, Earl Baylies, aged two years, whose mother was dead. In 1828 another daughter, Nancy, and her husband, John A. Marrs, were living in Shelbyville, Bedford County, Tenn.—Armstrong, Some Tennessee Heroes of the Revolution, vol. 5.

 

STONE, JOHN was placed on the pension roll of Lawrence County, Tenn., 1825, for four years' actual service as private, Pennsylvania Line. He was born in Berks County, Pa.; died, 1841, in Alabama.—D.A.R. Lineage Book, Vol. 97, p. 194.

 

STONE, REUBEN, aged 79, and a resident of Madison County; private, S.C. Continental Line; enrolled on January 4, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832 payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $80.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

STONE, SOLOMON—Applied for revolutionary pension while living in Madison County, Tenn., in 1832. He was born in Prince Edward County, Va., Dec. 3, 1752. He moved to Surrey County, N.C., before the Revolution and was living there when he enlisted in 1776 in North Carolina Troops under Capt. Richard Gold and Col. Joseph Williams. He was in the Long Island campaign under Gen. Christian. After the Revolution he moved to Georgia, then to South Carolina, then to Tennessee, then to Alabama and then to Marion County about 1829.—Armstrong, Some Tennessee Heroes of the Revolution, vol. 1.

 

STONE, WARREN HENLEY, was born in 1766, the son of John Stone and Mary Warren Stone of Charles County, Maryland. He was fourteen years, eight months old when he fought in the Battle of Guilford's Courthouse in March of 1781. Warren Stone was honored by the Anne Phillips Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Montogmery, Alabama Chapter on May 9, 2001, in Burkeville, Alabama. The Montgomery Advertiser on May 13, 2001 published an article on Warren Stone's grave marking by the DAR. Listed in North Carolina Revolutionary Soldiers, Sailors, Patriots and Descendants, compiled by Joseph T. Maddox and Mary Carter (Albany, Ga.: Georgia Pioneers Publications [1976]), vol ii, p. 177.

 

STOREY, HENRY, aged 77, and a resident of Greene County; sergeant, S.C. Militia; enrolled on July 2, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832; payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $120; sums received to date of publication of list, $360.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

STRANGE, ABNER A., aged 73, and a resident of Limestone County; private and sergeant, Virginia Continental Militia; enrolled on February 23, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832; payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $40; sums received to date of publication of list, $100.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

STROTHERS, WILLIAM, born 1750, died 1822, buried at Lower Peachtree, Ala. Was a soldier in the Revolution and member of the 2nd Provincial Congress of South Carolina, August 1775, member of the first General Assembly of South Carolina,1776.—General D.A.R. Report, 1915.

 

STRONG, JOHNSON, aged 75, and a resident of Fayette County; private; Virginia Militia; enrolled on January 9, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4 1831; annual allowance, $33; sums received to date of publication of list, $99.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Fayette County, June 1, 1840, aged 82. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148;

 

STROUD, MATTHEW—"On the third day of the term, being the 14th day of April, 1824, personally appeared in open court, it being court of record having authority to an unlimited amount and the power to fine and imprison for the County of Shelby aforesaid, Matthew Stroud, aged seventy-seven years a resident in the aforesaid County of Shelby, and who being duly sworn according to the law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the provision made by the Act of Congress of the 18th of March, 1818, and the first of May, 1820, that he; the said Matthew Stroud, enlisted for the term of: years on the......... day of .......in the year of Our Lord Seventeen Hundred and Seventy-Five in the State of North Carolina under the command of Colonel William McCaully in the lineof the State of North Carolina in the Third Regiment of the Continental establishment, that he continued to serve in the said until in the year of our Lord Seventeen Hundred and Seventy-Eight, when he was discharged from the said service in Brunswick County, in the State of Virginia; that he was in the battles of Brandywine, the battle of Lindley's Mill on Cain Creek, North Carolina, also at Guilford battle in the same State, and in all of which battles and during my service I held the rank of Major, all of which battles above enumerated was during the time that he belonged to the Continental Line and that he has lost his discharge and that he has no other evidence now in his power and in pursuance of the Act of the first of May, 1820, I do solemnly swear that I was a resident citizen of the United States on the 18th day of March, 1818, and that I have not since that time by gift, sale, or in any other manner, disposed of my property, or any part thereof, with intent so to diminish it as to bring myself within the provisions of an Act of Congress, entitled an Act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States in the Revolutionary War, passed on the 18th day of March, 1818, and that I have not, nor has any person in trust for me, any property or securities, contracts, or debts due to me, nor have I any income other than what is considered in the Schedule hereto annexed and by me subscribed, to-wit: One feather bed and clothes worth about fifteen or sixteen dollars and one bed worth two dollars. Some household furniture consisting of kitchen and other furniture worth about twenty-four dollars, fifteen head of hogs, worth about twenty dollars.

 

I do further state that my occupation is farming, but from my advanced age and sickness, I am unable to pursue it to advantage. I have no family except my wife, who is very old and unhealthy, and we are now dependent upon the charity of our Country for a support.

 

Matthew (his X mark) Stroud

Sworn to and declared on the 14th day of April in the year of our Lord, One Thousand Eight Hundred and Twenty-four.— From Minutes of Shelby County Circuit Court, April Term, 1824.

 

STROUD, MATHEW —Shelby County census of 1830 gives one male and one female between eighty and ninety.—See also Matthew Strouel.

 

STROUEL, MATHEW, aged 87, and a resident of Shelby County; private, N.C. State Troops; enrolled on June 17, 1834, under act of Ccngress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $20.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. Also resided in Bibb County. Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile.

 

STUDROE, READY, enrolled under act of Congress of March 18, 1818; no further details given.—Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile.

 

STURDEVANT, JOHN. "At his residence, in Summerfield, Dallas County, of apoplexy, on Saturday morning, the 21st December, 1856, ROBERT STURDEVANT, ESQ., one of the oldest citizens of this county.

 

 

"Mr. Sturdevant was born in Dinwiddie County, Virginia, on the 28th July, 1789, and was the son of Mr. John Sturdevant, a soldier of the Revolution. Mr. S. was brought to Hancock, Georgia, when quite young by his father, and remained there until 1818, when he removed to Alabama.

 

 "We knew Mr. Sturdivant, by report and personally, for the greater portion of our life, and when we came to Selma to reside, in 1845, he gave us the warmest and heartiest welcome. He was kind, liberal and hospitable—a sincere Christian—a charitable man—a good friend of ours, and it is with profound sorrow we record his death." The Dallas Gazete, Jan. 9, 1857..

 

SUGG, THOMAS —Lieutenant from North Carolina and came to Alabama in 1818, buried near Mt. Nebo Church, Russellville, Franklin County, Ala.—Alabama Military Archives, Montgomery, Ala. See also James' Distinguished Men, Women and Families of Franklin County, p. 105.

 

SUTTON, GEORGE, age not given, a resident of Mobile County; private, 7th Reg. U. S. Infantry; enrolled on April 18, 182a, payment to date from January 28, 1825; annual allowance, $96; sums received to date of publication of list, $826.10; Acts Military establishment.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

SUTTON, ROBERT, aged 76, and a resident of Lawrence County; private, S.C. Continental Line; enrolled on January 24, 1824, under act of Congress of March 18, 1818. Payment to date from November 10, 1823; annual allowance, $96; sums received to date of publication of list, $950.66.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. 

 

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