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Thomas McAdory Owen's Revolutionary Soldiers in Alabama

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y

 

PAINE, MATHEW, age not given, a resident of Marion County; private, Tennessee Volunteers; enrolled on February 3, 1826, payment to date from October 26, 1825; annual allowance, $96; sums received to date of publication of list, $706.61; April 24, 18l6. Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

PARKER, ELISHA. "Departed this life in Morgan County, Ala., on the 21st ult., ELISHA PARKER, in the 97th year of his age, a native of Connecticut, and a soldier of the Revolution. He was greatly esteemed and respected by all who knew him." The Democrat, Huntsville, May 6, 1846.

 

PARKER, WILLIAM, age not given, a resident of Madison County; private, 4th Regular U.S. Infantry; enrolled on September 6, 1820, payment to date from March 11, 1819; annual allowance, $96; sums received to date of publication of list, $1,437.90; Acts Military establishment.-- Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

PARR, JOHN. "DIED, on the 6th inst., at his residence about eight miles west of this place, Mr. John Parr, in the eighty-seventh year of his age. Mr. Parr emigrated from Fairfield District, S. Carolina, to this State about twelve years ago, and has since resided in the County till his death.

 

 "He entered into the service of his country at the age of sixteen, in the Revolutionary war, and served two campaigns. No man has left behind him a more unblemished character."— Alabama Beacon, Greensboro, Ala., January 16, 1847.

 

PATTON, —Lived at Claiborne, 1825, listed as one to be invited to LaFayette Celebration April 1825.—James Dellet Papers, Alabama Military Archives.

 

PAUGH, YOUNG. Young Paugh applied for revolutionary pension while living in Marion County, Tenn., in December 1833. He was born in Campbell County, Va., Jan. 1, 1754. He was living in Charlotte County, Va., when he enlisted in Virginia troops. After the War he moved to Greene County, Tenn., where he resided 34 years. He then moved to Blount County, Ala., and Macon County, N.C. He then moved to Marion County, Tenn.—Armstrong, Some Tennessee Heroes of the Revolution, Vol. 2.

 

PAYNE, MATHEY, aged 76, resided in Walker County, June 1, 1840. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 150.

 

PAYNE, WILLIAM, a resident of Marengo County; private, particular service not shown; enrolled on March 13, 1835, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $20. Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile.

 

PENCE, PHILIP—Name appears on Huntsville Monument, erected by Twickenham Town Chapter, D.A.R.

 

PENDEGRASS, SPENCER, aged 69, resided in Talladega County, June 1, 1840. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

 

PENN, STEPHEN, aged 74, and a resident of Lawrence County; private, Maryland State Troops; enrolled on May 2, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $31.33.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

PERRY, ABRAHAM, aged 69, and a resident of Butler County; private, S.C. Militia; enrolled October 3, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $80; sums received to date of publication of list, $200.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Part 3, Vol. xiii, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

PETTIGREW, JAMES, aged 73, and a resident of Greene County; private, S.C. Militia; enrolled on July 2, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $80; sums received to date of publication of list, $240. Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Greene County, June 1, 1840, aged 79. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.

 

PETTY, THEOPHILUS, sen., aged 82, resided in Butler County, June 1, 1840. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.

 

PETTY, WILLIAM, aged 70, and a resident of Madison County; private, N.C. Militia; enrolled on February 21, 1833, under act of Congress of Tune 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $20; sums received to date of publication of list, $50.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 5l4, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

PHILLIPS, ANDREW, aged 75, and a resident of Pickens County; private, N.C. Continental Line; enrolled on July 2, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $80.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

PHILLIPS, ANTHONY—"Departed this life, on the 12th February 1840, Mr. Anthony Phillips, in the 86th year of his age. He served in the Revolutionary War as a soldier, and was entitled to a pension, but would not be prevailed upon by his friends to avail himself of the same. He alleged as his reason of his refusal, that he had enough, and did not think it right, under such circumstances, to draw a pension from the government. Mr. Phillips emigrated from Charlotte County, Virginia, in the year 1818, and settled in Limestone County, Alabama, where he continued till his decease. He was a pious and orderly member of the M. E. Church, and had been for upward of fifty years. He was confined to his room and bed for the last five years, and bore his affliction with patience and resignation, and died in a calm repose without much pain or suffering. He left five children and a numerous circle of friends and acquaintances, to mourn their loss, though not without hope.—Communicated."—Huntsville Democrat, March 21, 1840.

 

PIERCE, HUGH, a resident of Jefferson County; private, particular service not shown; enrolled on September 17, 1834, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $30.—Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile.

 

PIERCE, JOHN, aged 82, and a resident of Dallas County; private, S. C. Militia; enrolled on March 5, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $40; sums received to date of publication of list, $120.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Dallas County, June 1, 1840, with Benjamin Crumblin, aged 95. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.

 

PIGG, CHARLES, aged 70, and a resident of Madison County; private, Virginia Continental Line; enrolled on December 31, 1832, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4. 1831; annual allowance, $20; sums received to date of publication of list, $60.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

PIPKIN, STEPHEN—Born August 2, 1757, Dobbs County, N. C., applied for a pension, September 5, 1835, while residing in Conecuh County, Ala. He stated that he volunteered in September 1775 or 1776 in Dobbs County, N. C. for six months under Capt. George Miller, Lt. Benjamin Exum, Col. Richard Caswell's Regiment. He marched immediately to the Widow Moore's creek to prevent tories from joining the British at Wilmington. The morning after the arrival of the regiment of about 1300 men they were attacked by the tories, supposed to be of a much larger force, who were routed. The regiment then returned to headquarters at Kingston on the Neuse River, in Daubs(?) County. After a short time they marched to Newbern and thence to Wilmington to attack the British, thinking they were still there but the British had left, the regiment remained there until the expiration of their time. Shortly after he was drafted for five months, and hired Thomas Grantham as a substitute, who served out his tour, without being in any engagement, principally against tories. While Charleston was being held by the British, he was again drafted for nine months in troops to march to Charleston. He hired William Peters as his substitute. He gave as reference Elisha Harrell, Darlington District, S.C., if alive. Affidavits were signed as to his character by Rev. Blanton P. Box and Whiting Oliver, of Conecuh County. The certificate was signed by Jeptha V. Perryman, Judge Conecuh County Court and Arthur J. Faust, Clerk. Hon. William R. King, Senator, U. S., was notified that the claim was rejected as he did not serve six months.—Pension File, National Archives, Washington, D. C.

 

PIPKIN, STEPHEN—Census of 1820, Conecuh County.

 

POE, JAMES—Maj. James Poe, moved from Carolinas in his old age with his son, Simon, and located at Newtonville, near Tuscaloosa, where he is buried. Tombstone over grave.—Information from Harry T. Poe, Poe Construction Co., Vero Beach, Fla.

 

POINTS, JOSEPH (1760-1837), in 1777 although a youth, joined the army, was wounded, and, recovering, rejoined the army and served until the surrender of the British at Yorktown. He was born in Philadelphia, Pa.; died in Courtland, Alabama.—D.A.R. Lineage Book, Vol. 65, page 30.

 

POOL, JOHN, aged 74, and a resident of Perry County; private, S.C. Militia; enrolled on June 5, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $20; sums received to date of publication of list, $50.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

POOL, SAMUEL, aged 80, resided in Russell County, June 1, 1840, with Matthew Pool. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.

 

POPE, LEROY. "One by one of those whose good fortune it was to be engaged in the struggle for American Independence quietly drop into the grave. Soon we will have only their memories and the recollection of their achievements to remind us of their patriotic labors.

 

 "Col. LEROY POPE has been gathered to his fathers. For four score years he led a life singular for its uniform probity and morality. He was born in Virginia in 1761 removed to Georgia in 1790—to this place in 1810, where he resided up to the time of his death on the 14th inst., beloved by his relatives and intimate friends, honored and esteemed by all. He was no common man, possessed of no common mind and filled no common place in our Society. The bustling incidents of his youth prevented his receiving a complete education; but his mind was one of a strong and vigorous character; bold, original and comprehensive, with a vast fund of common sense. Formerly possessing the whole of the present site of Huntsville, he was looked upon and was one of the chief patrons and founders of the place, and always took a deep interest in whatever affected the welfare of the town. His liberality and benevolence were notorious. The last ten years of his life were spent mostly in retirement, mingling but little in the turmoil of every-day life preparing in peace, in quiet serenity for another and different world, and at the time of his death he was a leading member of the Episcopal church.

 

"One of the chief pleasures of life, is to sit at the feet of the pioneers of our town and listen to them relate the early history of the place—the incidents connected with its settlement, and its original inhabitants. Acting a conspicuous part in all, and acquainted with all, it was a rare enjoyment to hear Col. Pope discourse in his colloquial manner of events in our history; and the only regret is that the pleasure was so seldom enjoyed. A mere child to him, a comparative stranger to his many virtues, and the part he acted in life's drama, we cannot speak more at length and with definiteness. His death has created a chasm, an aching void in society, which we know not who can fill.

 

"The action of the mayor and aldermen upon the loss our town has sustained, will be found below.

 

"At a called meeting of the Board of Aldermen of the Town of Huntsville, it was unanimously resolved that the corporate authorities attend the funeral of the late Col. Le Roy Pope in token of respect for the many private virtues and public services of the deceased."

 

June 14th, 1844.—Southern Advocate, Huntsville, June 21, 1844.

 

PORTER, ALEXANDER—Died yesterday morning, at his residence in Pleasant Valley, Mr. Alexander Porter, Sen., a soldier of the Revolution, aged 90 years.—Selma Courier, April 30, 1829.

In Memory of James Porter A Revolutionary Soldier who died 1840 aged about 85 years. —Cherokee Chapter, D.A.R. Pea Ridge Cemetery, Dallas County, Ala.

 

PORTER, JAMES, age not given, a resident of Dallas County; service and date of enrollment not given because of the loss of papers by the burning of the office of the War Department, 1801 and 1814; payment to date from September 5, 1808, annual allowance, $24, under which the sum of $177.17 received; transferred from Iredell County, N.C., from September 4, 1824; on April 30, 1816, to date from Jan. 22, 1816, rate increased to annual allowance of $48, under which the total sum of $733.82 received; and "on account of increased disability," rate increased, to date from May 4, 1831, to annual allowance of $96, under which the sum of $272.27 received to date of publication of list.——Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Dallas County, June 1, 1840, aged 80. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.

 

POSEY, HEZEKIAH, aged 90, resided in Benton County, June 1, 1840. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

 

POWELL, JOHN PEYTON, a resident of Madison County; lieutenant First Regular Virginia Line, enrolled on August 29, 1828, under act of Congress of May 15, 1828, payment to date from March 3, 1826; annual allowance, $320; sums received to date of publication of list, $2,720; Lemuel Mead, agent.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Madison County, June 1, 1840, aged 80. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148.

 

PRIDDY, RICHARD, aged 74, and a resident of Morgan County; sergeant, Virginia Continental Line; enrolled on June 4, 1818, under act of Congress of March 18, 1818, payment to date from May 13, 1818; annual allowance, $96; sums received to date of publication of list, $1,228.90.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

PRIDE, BURTON, aged 77, and a resident of Morgan County; private, Virginia Militia; enrolled on July 2, 1833. under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $60; sums received to date of publication of list, $150.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34.

 

PRIDE, EDWARD—"A recent historical ceremony of note was the placing of a marker at the grave of Maj. Edward Pride, a soldier of the Revolutionary War, who sleeps in Colbert County, a few miles from Tuscumbia, Ala. The exercises were sponsored by Colbert Chapter, D.A.R., of Tuscumbia, of which Mrs. Lula Merrill Simpson is the regent. After the assembly call by Sol Green, bugler, Rev. D. C. McNutt gave the invocation, which was followed by introductory remarks from the regent. Those assembled to do honor to the Revolutionary veteran joined in the American's Creed, after which 'America' was played by Smith's Concert Band. The marker was unveiled by two little children, both members of the seventh generation of Maj. Pride's descendants, Shirley Bragg, of Decatur, and Goodloe Rutland, of Tuscumbia. The address of the occasion was made by Rev. R. I. Walston, of Birmingham. After 'The Star-Spangled Banner' was played by the band, Commander James Dirago, of Colbert County Post No. 31, American Legion, led in a salute to the flag. An interesting sketch of the life and war record of Maj. Pride was given by one of his lineal descendants, James W. Rutland, some of the outstanding facts being as follows:

 

"Edward Pride was born near Raleigh, N.C., in 1755. Early in life he became a Methodist preacher and rode a circuit through Virginia and North Carolina. When Paul Revere made his famous ride, Edward Pride notified him that he would not only be a bearer of arms, but would he bearer of the message of Paul the Apostle.

"Edward Pride volunteered in Gen. Davidson's Brigade and ministered to the spiritual needs of this brigade throughout the war. In 1797 he left his North Carolina home, crossed the Blue Ridge Mountains, and finally settled near Decatur, Ala. Later he followed his sons to Franklin County, now Colbert, and established a home where he spent the remainder of his days. The benediction by Rev. M. McNutt and the blowing of taps fittingly closed the patriotic ceremonies."
Birmingham News, February 28, 1932.

 

PRUITT, WILLIAM—Name appears on the Huntsville Monument, erected by Twickenham Town Chapter, D.A.R.

 

PUGH, ELIJAH—In 1811 there came from Georgia a soldier of the Revolution, Elijah Pugh, whose ancestors came from that noted principality of Wales, and were fellow countrymen of Christmas Evans. He had at least four brothers. Three of these, John, William, and Alexander Pugh went to Indiana and settled near Indianapolis, where his descendants are still supposed to be living. Elijah Pugh had four sons who came also from Georgia to Clarke County; Isaac, Rezin, Jesse, and Stephen. He had three daughters, Miriam, who married Isaac Jackson, Achsah, who married Amos Robinson and after his death Giles Chapman, and Alvira who married Joseph Hall. Elijah Pugh died in June 1824, being sixty-three years of age. Robert Pugh, a fourth brother of Elijah Pugh, came also from Georgia in 1811 and settled in the same neighborhood. He had three sons, Elijah, Kinman, and Meredith, and four daughters, Betsey, who became Mrs. Smith and removed to Texas, Nancy, who became Mrs. Macon, and Martha, who married P. Jones. The following dates from ah old family Bible may properly be inserted here. Elijah Pugh was born in 1760. His wife, Ruth Julina was born in 1763. William Baskin was born in January 1768. His wife, Isabell Corvin, was born in September 1768. Isaac Pugh, born in 1785, son of Elijah and Ruth, married Hannah Baskin, born in 1793. 'Jesse Pickens Pugh; born in 1829, married S. Melissa Bettis in 1858. Isaac Pugh, was married to Hannah Baskin in 1809, and with his young wife he came in 1810, before his father, to the Indian wilds. He died in 1839. He had five sons, William. B., E. Stewart, John M., Stephen, and J. Pickens, and one daughter, Rebecca. Miss Rebecca Pugh married John Dunbar who removed to Texas. The descendants of Isaac Pugh are quite numerous. William B. Pugh has eight children. E. Stewart Pugh has four daughters and three sons. John M. Pugh has five children living. Stephen Pugh has six sons and one daughter. His wife was Miss Gilmore. J. Pickens Pugh has nine sons and daughters. Two of the daughters, Miss Mary and Miss Fredonia, are lovely girls, just entering womanhood. Rezin Pugh also married in Georgia. He had four sons, Isaac, Alvin, Jack R., and Elijah; and three daughters. Stephen Pugh, the fourth son of Elijah Pugh, never married. He learned the trade of a gunsmith. He is yet living about four miles from Grove Hill, now, in 1877, seventy-one years of age. He is still active, attends to his plantation, and is an intelligent, worthy citizen. Jessie Pugh married Miss Betsey Robinson. They removed to Louisiana about 1838. He had five sons, William, Aaron, Isaac, John, and Stephen, and four daughters.

 

The names of the descendants of the three sons of Robert Pugh are not at hand for this record; but they with those already named comprise many large families, who are residing in the same neighborhood where their ancestors settled, a few miles west of Grove Hill, and constitute, together with the Chapman families, a large and prosperous community. They are industrious, intelligent and enterprising, and are an excellent class of the citizens of this county.—Ball's History of Clarke County, Ala., pp. 309-310.

 

"Last week a number of the members of the Elijah Pugh chapter, D.A.R., of Jackson, visited the tomb of Elijah Pugh, Revolutionary soldier, about four miles west of Grove Hill, where they planted an ornamental tree as a living memorial to the patriot from whom the chapter takes its name. The grave is located in the family burial ground just in front of the former home of Elijah Pugh, which is still occupied by lineal descendants of the Revolutionary hero in the persons of Isaac Pugh and his sister, Miss Cora Pugh. Near this home passed the war trail of the friendly Choctaws under Pushmatahah when they joined Gen. Jackson in his war upon the Creeks, and in this home the great Chief visited his friend, the first Elijah Pugh. The family burial ground, which is neatly kept, contains not only the grave Elijah Pugh, but that of his wife, Ruth St. Julina, one of the French Huguenots exiled from France and settling in South Carolina and Georgia; and that of—DUBOUT, another Revolutionary soldier, whose first name has been lost with the passing of the years, though some of the older families of the county are known to bear relation to him. Besides these graves of pioneers there are others of those who came after them, and were related to them in various degrees of consanguinity. It is the purpose of the Pugh family to deed this cemetery to the National Society, D.A.R., who in turn will see that this shrine of patriotism receives perpetual care.

 

"Members of the Grove Hill Chapter (Elizabeth Bradford) also took part in the tree planting ceremonies, their contribution being an Arbor Vitae. They were Mrs. Mary Waite Tucker, Miss Mabel Waite, Mrs. J. N. Cooper, Mrs. Jesse Pugh and Mrs. Jackson. The members of local chapter visiting the tomb on this occasion were Mrs. W. W. Andrews, regent, Mrs. W. A. Calhoun, recording secretary; Mrs. J. M. Weston, corresponding secretary and Mrs. J. Loranz, chaplain. Nine members of the Jackson Chapter and many members of the Grove Hill Chapter are direct descendants of Elijah Pugh."—Birmingham News, February 8, 1931.

 

PULLEN, WILLIAM, aged 76, and a resident of Jefferson County; private, Virginia Continental Line; enrolled on April 12, 1831, under act of Congress of March 18, 1818, payment to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $96; sums received to date of publication of list, $240.—Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in Jefferson County, June 1, 1840, aged 82. Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149.

 

 "The grave of William Pullen is in Jefferson County, in the suburbs of Birmingham, in an old family burying gronnd about fifty yards from the Avondale car line between 34th and 35th streets. For many years this old graveyard was as isolated and secluded as if situated in the heart of a lonely forest, but, in the last year or two, houses have been built up thickly around it and are encroaching upon its boundaries. The grave of the soldier lies at the foot of a large oak tree; it is a rough mound of brown stones with a flat tablet topping them which bears this inscription:

 

Sacred to the Memory of WILLIAM PULLEN A Soldier of the Revolution, Who died April 4th, 1845, Aged 87 years.

 

"His wife lies at his feet but the lettering of the tablet at her grave is illegible, only the words 'Wife of William Pullen.'

 

"Descendants of William Pullen declare that he died at the age of ninety-six and that he was born in the year 1749. But as his name is found in the Census of Pensioners for 1840 and he is recorded as being eighty-two years of age at that date, and this agrees perfectly with what appears to be the age on the tombstone, the writer has accepted the latter as correct. William Pullen then was born in Virginia in 1758, on the Appomattox river near Petersburg. He entered the Revolutionary War from Virginia and was in service for seven years. Soon after the Revolution he moved to South Carolina and in 1820 he came to Alabama and settled near Birmingham. He was the first man buried with military honors in Jefferson County.

 

"He left six children: (1) Clarissa, who married Jesse Hickman, and they were the parents of W. P. Hickman formerly County commissioner for Jefferson County; (2) Sarah who married James Rowan, and they were the parents of Peyton Rowan, of Jacksonville, Ala.; (3) William, married Nancy Brooks; (4) Martha, married Joseph Hickman; (5) Mary married Samuel Rowan; (6) Elizabeth, married Richard Tankersley.

 

"It is shown in the records at Washington, D.C., in the Record and Pension Office, 'that one William Pullen served as a private in Captain George Lambert's company of Continental regulars of the 14th battalion, 14th Virginia regiment of foot, commanded by Colonel Charles Lewis. Revolutionary War.' He enlisted January 1, 1777, to serve three years and his name last appears as that of a private on a roll dated Camp near Morristown. December 9, 1779, of Captain Overton's company, 10th Virginia regiment, commanded by Col. William Davies. The records show that the 14th Virginia Regiment became the 10th Virginia regiment about November, 1778, and that about May, 1779, the lst and 10th Virginia regiments were incorporated and designated the 1st and 10th Virginia regiment."—Mrs. P. H. Mell, in Transactions of the Alabama Historical Society, Vol. iv, pp. 558-560. 

 

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